2008-01 Polychromatic Seedpot with Batwing Design

Object ID:
2008-01

Artist:
Annie Healing Nampeyo, Fannie Nampeyo

Culture:
Hopi

Dimensions:
3.625” h X 5.75” w

The batwing design was used by Nampeyo and became a classic Nampeyo family design. In my opinion, this batwing design was the most elegant design painted by Fannie. [For another batwing jar painted by Fannie, see 2009-14.]

Annie was born in 1883; her daughter Rachel was born in 1900. Fannie was probably born the same year as Rachel. Thus, although Annie and Fannie are sisters, there is a generation of age between them. Although it has long been known that Fannie painted pots formed by her mother (cf. 2007-12), this is the first pot that I have seen where Fannie painted for a sibling. Such cooperation is not reported in the literature, though it is not surprising. (See McChesney 2003.)

As detailed in the catalog description for 2007-12, most of the pots in the collection that are signed “Nampeyo” were probably painted by Fannie and are rather simple, even crude, pots with uninspired design. Pot 2008-01 is a collaboration between Annie and Fannie and is an exception to this pattern: it is well formed with a careful, elegant design that perfectly fits the pot.

See “Bat Wing Design” in the Category List for a complete listing of pots in this collection using variations of this design.

A photograph of Nampeyo taken in 1934 by Mrs. Williams is reprinted in Messier & Messier, 2007:35.

Purchase History:
Purchased on 2/24/08 on eBay from Scott Trebatoski of Ft. Myers, FL. He had purchased it in 1999 from the descendents of Mrs. Berta Williams, “who served as a missionary/teacher at Hopi from 1928-1934.” Apparently the pot was part of a set of three of similar shape and design that were either purchased by Ms. Williams or given to her as a gift when she left Hopi about 1934. Ms. Williams changed her last name to Callahan after her marriage. As related to Scott Trebatoski by members of the Callahan family, in addition to 2008-01, the set included one pot that was larger (and sold earlier) and a “sister” pot of similar size that remains in the Callahan family. Apparently, writes Trebatoski, there were two smaller pots “because they were meant for her two children.” He added that when 2008-01 and the provenance was shown to Barbara Kramer, she noted, “The fact that there were more than one of the same design… may make them a requested group by the Fred Harvey Company or another reseller of pottery.”